British
Human
Power
Club

 

Posts From May, 2009

Fairing Measurements 

It has now been established

1. that I know Everything and

2. that Bob Knight knows Absolutely Nothing Whatsoever and so he has to consult me, always, to find out what to do next.

 

Accordingly I guided him smoothly onto the next stage by sending him a Fantastick Pickchure of how I'm building my own fairing, which of course will be much better than his. My fairings are always of foam, because foam is stretchy and bendable and silent and protective in a fall and cheap (the stuff blows out of apple crates and litters the roadside in 4x8 sheets) and they are always incredibly beautiful. Well, more beautiful than Paul Lowing's tailboxes.




My technique this time is to use a cruddy old mount and jam a sheet of cardboard (bike box) on it and then glue thin strips of cedar to blocks of willow and thereby make a 3D mount which weighs nothing.

 
Mr Knight is entranced and impressed by this technique, which he has only ever used a great many times when a schoolboy to make model aeroplanes. Accordingly:


 
 
Attached photo is of tonight's work As you can see the big effort at the moment is to get the dimensions correct around the feet. I'm going to extend the top bit to include my knees and trim a bit off so I can ride it down the street and check clearance; so far so good. I think effort spent on this now will be tres beneficial since it will prevent rework later. I can *just* start off in the lowest gear with the 'normous chainring. I will need to do this a few times I think. - Bob
 

Possum bars 




Mr Knight who is a Low Creature and a toe-rag and a scumbag and a Foolish Person asked what to bring to New Zealand and instantly I replied 'a lathe' and being a L.C., t-r., s. and F.P. he ignored me and on arrival discovered how vastly clever I am because having grown up with one he really wanted a Myford Super Seven but such as appeared for sale were what engineers call Knackered.
New Zealand has a low population of lathes.
 
 
Yet being a guardian angel I magicked a Super Seven out of the ether in gloriously perfect condition. (In passing, Norm Milne of Stoke, the gentle old man who had cared for this lathe - old lathes never die - had preserved it in lanolin for fifty years from the salty Nelson air. Norm was a star of Nelson Model Engineering Club.) For the record it cost $NZ 1600, which since that's only about six or seven hundred quid is the finest bargain ever known among lathe owners. As I say, Norm Milne was a gentleman.
 
 
 
The following e-exchanges now took place. (We can record them accurately. Mr Knight lives six hours away. All discourse is by e.)
 

It now occurs to me that I will need a higher range of gears. I *think* my current setup is 53/12 on the rear 559 MTB rim. In all races so far this gear has proved sufficiently high and always gets used. Ideas? - Bob

Biggest one I've got is an unused 58 from a downhill bike. - R

Ha, so what BCD is the 58 chainring? 4 or 5 arm?I suspect that it is either 110mm, standard MTB or 130, shitmano road. The spitfire fund needs to know. - Bob

Il y a five holes sur il. Each hole est 65mm from le next hole. Stamped sur one side it says 'DH 58T BCD 110'. In other matters, my mother-in-law is a horrible old witch. But she's going on Friday. Either we shall be very, very sad to see her go or we shan't, and I'm not going to tell you which. I am going swimming now and will be bitterly disappointed if I tread on a stingray and get killed before she goes. R


Bugger fuck, because my crankset is a shitmano road at 130 BCD. I'll have to buy one and I didn't think 58 was big enough anyway and I bought a 55W glue gun and *lots* of glue sticks today for purposes of sticking corriboardcorrexcoreflutekoretake. Axshully that last one doesn't belong there, it's the Maori word for slacker, I have no comment on that. I made some little jigs last night to try to discover the bounds of whirring feet, but feet whirr differently backwards to forwards and I will need to make some adjustable do dads and go for a short ride to establish this. I also need to make the ratracer tiller steering since the widest point at the moment is the handlebars on full lock (which isn't much). This is turning into an ordeal already. I've just looked at Simon Sandersons pictures of his new streamliner. *Anything* we make is shite in comparison:
Warning: much time wasting could be spent looking at that link. - Bob


Therefore Mr K set up said lathe and promptly made some possum bars and a 64-tooth chainwheel.

 
The bars were to be welded up by Gavin Keats who is an aircraft engineer and who has built his own aluminium velomobile. This resulted in:

Now then young man, I feel I have been remiss in replying these past few days but I am busier than Talley's PR dept (1). I will try and recap.
1) Gavin Keats is going to weld up the bits for the tiller next Wednesday, that means I can install it very soon and see how bad the handling is, if bad I will ditch it and return to the original bars. In programming terms this is known as a ternary statement and in this case would be written like this:
_handlebars = ((_tiller == ridable ? _tiller : _original);
you didn't need to know that but I'm at work and that's where my head is right now.
2) I have started to make a 64 tooth chainring, this prompted by the shocking price of 'real' chainrings on t'internet. Cheapest I saw was 300 NZ lira dollars. No way. Going ok so far, I *love* my dividing head. I'm slightly concerned that the grade of aluminiumiunmium I have used is too soft, but then it only has to last an hour.
3) I have ordered my Coreflute Correx Corriboard Fluteboard from a plastic shop here in town and will pick it up at lunchtime, I've got 2 sheets of 3mm for skinning the thing and 1 sheet of 8mm + another of 5mm for the structure, think model aeroplane. That's how I did the tailfairing on the Windcheetah. I will experiment with hot glue later and see if I need to use dental floss and tape again. In programming terms this is also a ternary statement, an alternative way of expressing the statement is:
if (_hotGlue + Corriboard == strong){ _construction = _hotglue;}else{ _construction = _dentalFloss + _tape;}
but you didn't need to know that either.
That is all. - Bob

1. Talley's are a local firm who made the national news when it was revealed that people were perturbed to open packets of Talley's Frozen Peas and find then half-full of Black Nightshade berries.


Later, I had the following:

Possum[1] bars are *quite* hard to get used to at first. I rode on the lawn at first and crashed a lot, then began to get the hang of it a little, so this morning I took the Ratracer over the ghastly Ashley bridge and up to Carrs road which more or less goes straight for 19km right into the wop wops. It does wiggle a little and also goes up and down rather a lot as roads do, but because it goes nowhere it is very quiet. Anyway because I was new to the bars and occupying more of the lane than I really should I was taking it relatively easy at first. I averaged 38.2 kph for the 40km with a max of 62kph ( that's ~23.8mph and 38.7mph resp. in old money). The bars are decidedly twitchy and I'm having to learn to ride all over again it seems; however by the end I was able to pedal reasonably hard around gentle bends, but tighter bends had my sphincter all puckered up in an unseemly manner. This will probably ease. The 64T chainring was a great success and I was able to use top gear for extended periods over 50kph with no trouble as long as the road was straightish. I also seem to have a death grip on the bars at the moment; the handling improved when I forced myself to relax when I became aware of it.

Bob

[1] not hamster bars, possum bars. Relatively recently introduced and hard to control.




 

detailed plans 

Friday, May 15, 2009 11:23:13 AM

I am in receipt of the following email from Mr Knight:

I've been busy tonight. The detailed design doc is to scale and will be exactly what the finished thing will look like. Probably.

Members may recall Mr Knight dandling his two-year-old at Leicester, in the brief hour before he was unable to dandle two-year-olds owing to his suffering a mishap, which I will not describe in case it raises horrid and painful memories. (He fell off. He fell right off on a corner and flew through the air at 35 mph landing with a mighty crash and absolutely, completely skinning himself, whereafter he took to wearing those crocodile skin thingies that you put on your elbows, not that this would have helped because it wasn't his elbows wot got skinned.) That toddler is now an inquisitive eight-year-old and, I am told, needs labels attaching to Mr Knight's lathe to stop him fiddling with the cross-slide settings. Members will further guess, correctly, that Master Knight is named Louis. (I like to call him Lewis because I happen to know for an actual fact that this winds his parents up.)

NZ Hour Record 

Friday, May 15, 2009 11:15:51 AM
Mrs My Wife was on call last night. At 4.30 came a call for a chap who had his arm stuck in a conveyor. The Colonial is congenitally unable to resist fiddling with machinery, to his morphological detriment. If you see a man in the Dominions with both arms and both legs and all of his fingers, then he's probably a new immigrant. It follows that Bob Knight - or such of him as isn't still smeared on Abbey Park Leicester - feels relatively at home here.

Accordingly I have deemed it vital - well, int'resting - well, a way to justify my otherwise pathetic existence - to document Mr Knight's attempt at the NZ Hour Record, which is currently held by Robb Simpson inside Miles's Bean:

Flying 200m 9.758 seconds - or 73.79 kph - or 45.85 mph Teretonga Raceway, Southland
1st May 1993
Hour 49.987 km Denton Velodrome, Hornby, Christchurch

15th June 1994
It was with the very same Bean that Pat Kinch had set the hour record of 75.575 km back in 1989. Robb essentially went at the same pace for 200m, as Pat did for one whole hour.
(Pinched, without troubling myself to ask his permission, from Paul Dunlop, KiwiHPV Hon. Sec.)

I shall endeavour to update these notes regularly and it remains to be seen which of us gets bored first.

The ensuing frantic rash of information is because Mr Knight has already been a-building in his shed, egged on and closely advised by The Heroic Moi as Chief Advisor and Senior Important Person. (Those of you who know Mr Knight will recall that he is unmotivated, of low IQ, has lamentable standards of craftsmanship, a very poor and feeble grasp of bicycle mechanics, and only really exists as a set of muscles. I very kindly make up for all these deficiencies by urging him on.)
Page 3 of 3 << < 1 2 3
Copyright 2006 Blog Author